Sign up HERE to receive our newsletter

Adding Fasting to Praying

Then I turned my face to the Lord God, seeking him by prayer and pleas for mercy with fasting and sackcloth and ashes. Daniel 9:3

A friend asked me to pray. She felt the issue was big enough in her life that she was going to fast as well as pray. She had recently read the Book of Daniel and was following his example.

Driven to Pray

In Daniel 9:2 Daniel understands, from the Word of God, that the exile is about to be over. That realization drives him to prayer and fasting. Daniel 9:3, “Then I turned my face to the Lord God, seeking him by prayer and pleas for mercy with fasting and sackcloth and ashes.”

Most of Daniel’s prayer is his confession of the sins of the nation, including his own. Daniel 9:15 sums it up this way, “And now, O Lord our God, who brought your people out of the land of Egypt with a mighty hand, and have made a name for yourself, as at this day, we have sinned, we have done wickedly.”

Sin and Sacrifice

We are a people who hate to think about our own sin, no less fasting as we confess it. Most of us grew up being cheered on by enthusiastic parents (and now we do that with our children). We like to think of ourselves as good people. Good people don’t need to fast and pray, right?

With prayer and fasting we sacrifice food so that our spiritual attention is keener.  When we deprive ourselves of food, we can begin to focus on the harder things to think about. When we fast for a purpose and we get hungry, we are being reminded to remember to pray. A fast without a specific purpose is spiritually useless.

Confession of sin is also a sacrifice. Spiritually, we are sacrificing that deceived image of ourselves as “good” for the truth that we are sinners before a Holy God. Daniel took this seriously for the whole nation of Israel who was living in exile in Babylon.

Daniel’s prayers were also humble, including himself. It would have been much easier to see the sin of others. Israel had been taken from their land and exiled to Babylon where there was plenty of wickedness. But, he didn’t point God to the sin of Babylon. He prayed with fasting for his own sin and the sin of his people.

Daniel said his prayers were for “Your own sake, O Lord.” Perhaps some of the reason that Daniel received insight and understanding was because his eyes were on the glory of God and not just relief from his own situation.

All things that are for God’s glory are also for our good. If God was glorified in the confession of sin through Daniel, then my prayer friend is on to something in following his example.

When you and I pray, are we concerned for the glory of God? Are we humble to confess our own sin? When the need is great, will we fast so that we sacrifice and think about God’s purpose rather than our own?

My friend’s invitation to fast and pray pointed me to the meat of the Word of God. I pray it’s also food for thought for you.

 

Grace & Such strives to advance Christian growth among women. While we believe the Bible is the inspired Word of God, we also recognize human interpretations are imperfect. Grace & Such encourages our readers to open their Bibles, pray for wisdom and study for themselves what the Word says. For more about who we are, please visit the About Us page.
Beth Bingaman
Follow Me

Beth Bingaman

Writer & Bible Teacher at bethbingaman.com
I am a follower of Jesus Christ, a Mom, and a Mom-Mom, called by God to teach His Word.

I love serving Jesus Christ as one who “feeds His sheep”. It is my desire to teach God’s Word diligently, with reverence and awe for the Source of the truths I teach, and with an engaging, and sometimes witty, delivery so that the hearers will not just listen but do what it says.
Beth Bingaman
Follow Me

Latest posts by Beth Bingaman (see all)

5 Comments

  1. Diane on March 5, 2018 at 10:57 AM

    “Perhaps some of the reason that Daniel received insight and understanding was because his eyes were on the glory of God and not just relief from his own situation.” Ouch. Gives me much to ponder in the motives for a fast…thanks, Beth. As always, deeply insightful

  2. Natalie Liounis on March 5, 2018 at 11:07 AM

    “All things that are for God’s glory are also for our good.” Amen! Even when we don’t like it, God’s will is perfect and good. Thanks for this reminder this morning. And for the reminder to humble myself in prayer, because I haven’t been very good at that lately.

  3. Jen on March 6, 2018 at 2:37 PM

    Isn’t it funny how humble confession leads to more concern for God’s glory than our (my) own? Thank you once again for sharing your wisdom and making me think.

  4. Sarah Robinson on March 6, 2018 at 9:21 PM

    Thank you for expanding on Daniel. What an amazing example his determination to serve God, in the midst of such persecution. I’m quite sure his example still inspires many of our persecuted brothers and sisters, still today. His attitude toward God, and his unwillingness to bend to the king’s feast, or to the seduction we are all so susceptible to, make him a real hero of the faith.

  5. Tara Watson on March 14, 2018 at 10:50 AM

    “His eyes were on the glory of God and not just relief from his own situation.”
    I often find that when I turn my focus back to God, I am filled with peace. My situation may never be resolved to my liking, but it’s always resolved to His. And that brings me comfort.

Leave a Comment





This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: